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dc.contributor.authorDanell, James
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-21T20:33:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-21T20:33:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://essays.wisluthsem.org:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/6243
dc.description.abstractIn language study one faces the choice between learning about a language versus directly learning a language. If I learn about a language, I learn about its grammar, vocabulary, and syntax and about how each of these things is used. When I’m done, however, there’s no guarantee that I can use any of that to actually create and communicate my own meaning. If, however, I instead directly learn a language, when I’m done, I not only know about i t, but I can actually use it to create and communicate my own meaning. In carrying out my assignment, I had a decision to make. Should we learn about these treatises of Luther? Or should we learn them—directly? I opted for the latter, which means that by and large I will let Luther speak for himself, with lots of quotations.1We will follow what I will call the theological order of the treatises, not their chronological order. It’s in his treatise The Freedom of a Christian that Luther presents the biblical, reformation doctrine of justification by grace through faith. His treatise On Good Works speaks to the sanctified life of the believer that springs fundamentally from his justification through faith in Jesus.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWisconsin Lutheran Seminaryen_US
dc.subjectMartin Lutheren_US
dc.subjectFreedom of a Christianen_US
dc.subjectTreatise on Good Worksen_US
dc.subjectGood Worksen_US
dc.subjectLeo Xen_US
dc.subject1 Corinthians 9:19en_US
dc.subjectRomans 13:8en_US
dc.titleThe Freedom of a Christian and Treatise on Good Worksen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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